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TODD'S WOOD


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TODD'S WOOD


AT A GLANCE

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A QUICK INTRO


A QUICK INTRO


i'm todd & i make things out of wood.

Most of my projects right now are home and kitchen ware and accessories. But for the most part, I make things that I really like and hope that other people like too. Every one of my projects is made with pride and I refuse to charge for anything that I wouldn't mind having in my house. What that means for you: you get a quality, handmade product whose maker is super proud of it. With that being the case, if you are ever unsatisfied, please let me know.

There are some items that I'll almost always have in stock. Stuff like cutting boards, cheese boards, and candle holders will be out the door within a week of being ordered.

What I really love are custom orders. You want a cool looking table? Done. Got an idea for a crazy patterned cutting board? Alright. Want a custom headboard made with a specific type of wood, chamfered corners, and to be blessed by a Rabbi? Uh, I'll find one... The point is, if you have a challenging project, I want to do it.

If you have an idea for a great project, let me be your guy. I'll buy you coffee, bring you into the woodshop, and make sure your dream project becomes a reality.

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A WORD ON WOOD


A WORD ON WOOD


PRIMARY

SECONDARY

END-GRAIN

End grain boards are the chef's standard for cutting boards. The end grain is the piece of the wood where the fibers terminate. If you were to imagine a 2x4, it would be the smallest side, on top. End grain boards accept knives into the board, and self-heal once the knife is removed. This allows end grain boards to last nearly three generations if properly taken care of.

EDGE-GRAIN

Edge grain boards use less wood, and are generally cheaper. For home use, they make good cutting boards. They cannot have any checkered or alternating shapes. If used regularly, edge grain boards will need to be sanded more than an end grain board.

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BOARDS


BOARDS


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CANDLES


CANDLES


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Paddles


Paddles


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CARE FOR YOUR BOARD


CARE FOR YOUR BOARD


1. DO NOT put your cutting board in the dishwasher.
Not only do you risk it coming apart, but you’ll also break my heart.

2. Wash your board with warm water and a mild soap, scrubbing on both sides.

3. Place your board on its side to dry.
Since wood loves to carry moisture, when you lay it flat water can become trapped under the board and cause it to expand, contract, and basically warp into a Pringle.

4. The grain of the wood is your best defense against germs.
Bacteria on the surface of the board are pulled into the grain by those nifty water channels, and are killed as the grain dries. So, no need to over-wash your board and risk warping, breaking my heart, etc

5. Feed your board with mineral oil at least four times a year.
We use HOWARD’S BUTCHER BLOCK OIL AND CONDITIONER on our boards.

6. Make it good-as-new.
If your board gets knife marks or gouges after years of use, an easy sanding with an orbital sander and a coat of board conditioner should do the trick.